SoftActivity

Employee Monitoring :
An Expert Guide

Each day when your employees enter the building, do they walk in, make their way to their workspace, and dive into their work? Or do they saunter in a few (or many) minutes late, socialize around the coffee pot for half an hour, and then head to their desk. . . to check their Facebook?

Employee Monitoring

Each day when your employees enter the building, do they walk in, make their way to their workspace, and dive into their work? Or do they saunter in a few (or many) minutes late, socialize around the coffee pot for half an hour, and then head to their desk. . . to check their Facebook?

With a plethora of live and digital options competing to entice workers’ eyes and minds away from their jobs, more and more companies are turning to employee monitoring. With an employee monitoring strategy in place, organizations can boost productivity, reduce business risk, improve the quality of work, enhance security, protect intellectual property, and keep people productive, all day.

Employee monitoring is broadly defined as a way for employers to observe and track employee activity while in the workplace, when accessing the corporate network, or when representing the company outside of the office. It can be accomplished in a number of ways, usually by designing a solution made up of several types of tracking or surveillance, which may include:

  • ID badges that use bar codes, magnetic stripes, proximity, smart credential, or radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies to track and manage employees and assets.
  • Closed-circuit video cameras that record employee activities, and can offer the ability to search by event, activity, time, and date.
  • Software monitoring allows employers to observe and track computer use, including emails written and received, application use, individual keystrokes, websites visited, network logon/off times, files copied to USB drives, and location (for remote workers).
  • Onsite security staff serving to deter unauthorized access to buildings or equipment, and employee mischief or theft.
  • Biometric facial-recognition systems that utilize cameras and Artificial Intelligence to confirm identity by comparing facial textures and shapes with databases using photos or video frames.
  • Phone tapping can be used to establish facts around employee productivity and provide documentation in cases where leaks of confidential information and/or trade secrets may be a concern.
  • Location tracking uses GPS or RFID technology in company-issued phones to identify employee location and movements. GPS can also be used for fleet vehicles tracking.
  • Private investigators are sometimes engaged by organizations wanting to monitor employee meetings outside of the office (in cafes, coffee shops, etc.) in circumstances in which there is suspicion about information leaks.